The Double Helix by James D. Watson

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Read The Double Helix Online Free - By identifying the structure of DNA, the molecule of life, Francis Crick and James Watson revolutionized biochemistry & won themselves a Nobel Prize. At the time, Watson was only 24, a young scientist hungry to make his mark. His uncompromisingly honest account of the heady days of their thrilling sprint against other world-class researchers to solve one of science's greatest mysteries gives a dazzlingly clear picture of a world of brilliant scientists with great gifts, very human ambitions & bitter rivalries. With humility unspoiled by false modesty, Watson relates his & Crick's desperate efforts to beat Linus Pauling to the Holy Grail of life sciences, the identification of the basic building block of life. Never has a scientist been so truthful in capturing in words the flavor of his work.



Title : The Double Helix
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 0451037707
Edition Language : English
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 143 pages


Reviews


Emer rated it ★☆☆☆☆

January 08, 2017

Do not view my rating on this book as an indictment of the science. The story of the discovery of the structure of DNA is a fascinating one and makes for a compelling must-read book. The research behind it merited a Nobel Award... But as any first year science student worth their salt can tell yo...


Nikki rated it ★☆☆☆☆

February 24, 2014

I ended up skimming this. I really hope his more recent book DNA: The Secret of Life is considerably more interesting and considerably less sexist. It should be a fascinated story, but really it's mostly about James D. Watson bouncing around between different supervisors and making sexist comment...


Darwin8u rated it ★★★★☆

May 02, 2016

“In the end, though, science is what matters; scientists not a bit.” ― Steve Jones in, James D. Watson's The Double Helix I gave it three stars last night (DNA night, thanks Riku), but that just didn't seem right. The structure wasn't stable, and I felt it probably deserved four stars (one for A,...


Douglas rated it ★★★★☆

June 20, 2014

I made the mistake of reading this over a long period of time. I see now that it really needs to be read in just a few sittings. Also, a basic background in chemistry and physics (none of which I have) would be beneficial. Thank goodness for Wikipedia. This is the riveting story of the discovery...


Carlos rated it ★★☆☆☆

February 02, 2009

Shows how arrogant, misogynistic, and plain stupid the "discoverers" of DNA's double helix were. Pros: Emphasizes the importance of being able to access a free, open, creative, in some ways childish state of mind in order to allow for truly creative and "defocalized" states of mind that allow for...


Tony61 rated it ★★★★★

September 20, 2012

James D. Watson became a controversial figure later in life, but this story recounts the seminal event in his life: the 1953 discovery of the structure of DNA for which he received the 1962 Nobel Prize in Physiology with his collaborator Francis Crick and another, Maurice Wilkins. Watson is an ex...


Tariq rated it ★★★★★

September 24, 2014

اللولب المزدوج . الحمض النووي . اصل الحياة الأن فترة استعداد لي إمتحان القادم في بايو كمستري ، كان نصيب الأمس في دراسة شيت "شابتر"الأحماض النووية ، وبالطبع الدكتور شرح مقدمة علي مكتشف الدنا ، وطبعا فضولي النابع من الحسد للمكتشفين واصحاب جائزة نوبل خلاني نبحث عليه لعند ماوصلت لتحفة ورواية شخصية لي...


heidi rated it ★★☆☆☆

March 26, 2013

I have no doubt that James Watson was a (pretty) competent scientist - although the way he writes it, every thing seemed to favor him up to the discovery of the double helix structure. He chose the field by a mix of chance and cunning, having eliminated other fields which would require more effor...


Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ rated it ★★☆☆☆

November 20, 2014

I had to read this book for a science class in college. I've never forgiven that teacher.


Roy rated it ★★★★☆

June 15, 2016

After reading Bill Bryson’s wonderful A Short History of Nearly Everything, I’ve been effectively disabused of the notion that scientists are purely logical, rational, and reasonable folk, and that science progresses through mild-mannered and careful thinking. I bet it does, sometimes. But, like...





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