The Invisible Girls: A Memoir by Sarah Thebarge

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Read The Invisible Girls: A Memoir Online Free - Twenty-seven-year-old Sarah Thebarge had it all - a loving boyfriend, an Ivy League degree, and a successful career - when her life was derailed by an unthinkable diagnosis: aggressive breast cancer. After surviving the grueling treatments - though just barely - Sarah moved to Portland, Oregon to start over. There, a chance encounter with an exhausted African mother and her daughters transformed her life again.

A Somali refugee whose husband had left her, Hadhi was struggling to raise five young daughters, half a world a way from her war-torn homeland. Alone in a strange country, Hadhi and the girls were on the brink of starvation in their own home, "invisible" to their neighbors and to the world. As Sarah helped Hadhi and the girls navigate American life, her outreach to the family became a source of courage and a lifeline for herself.

Poignant, at times shattering, Sarah Thebarge's riveting memoir invites readers to engage in her story of finding connection, love, and redemption in the most unexpected places.



Title : The Invisible Girls: A Memoir
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 1455523917
Edition Language : English
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 272 pages


Reviews


Beth rated it ★★★☆☆

April 21, 2013

Very mixed feelings about this one; but I think it's well worth the read. This memoir was really three stories, two of them very absorbing and the third...well, for me, not so much. Briefly, a young woman who was raised in a fundamentalist religious home, grows up to far surpass what was "expecte...


Rebecca rated it ★★★★★

November 09, 2015

This book was unlike anything I've ever read before. The Invisible Girls is the story of two women in recovery, one from breast cancer and the other from having to leave her country for an unfamiliar one. They find solace in each other and their friendship is written in a style that's very diffic...


Jennie rated it ★☆☆☆☆

January 05, 2015

I have no doubt that Thebarge means well. However, this memoir is disjointed, self-serving, and completely privilege blind. It is half of the story; a minute glimpse into the plight of a family of Somalian refugees wholly through the lens of a young, American cancer survivor. We get zero time wit...


Quiltgranny rated it ★★☆☆☆

February 11, 2013

I was drawn in by the title of this book, and I must say I am still unclear who exactly Ms. Thebarge means. Is it her, because of her breast cancer diagnosis at an early age; is it the family of Somalians she befriends; or the little girls of that family that are invisible? This was not an easy re...


Paul rated it ★★★★★

May 05, 2013

I read this post from Sarah on a Saturday, ordered the book almost immediately and had it in hand early the next week. Within 36 hours from the time I glanced at the first pages, I'd read the entire thing. I hardly ever do this – some books take me months to read. A number of things about this...


Meghan rated it ★★★☆☆

March 04, 2013

When I read the back of the book - I was intrigued. A young woman, lost in life due to her struggle with cancer, encounters a family of immigrants on a bus. She connects with them and finds common ground with the "invisible girls." It's an uplifting journey for the family and the author, though u...


Melanie rated it ★☆☆☆☆

September 25, 2014

I wanted to like this book, I really did. It was recommended to me by a dear friend who is also a writer, and the topic of immigrants and poverty and spiritual growth are close to my heart. But I can't recommend it. Either the writer is too young to be writing memoir or she is still too close to...


Larry rated it ★★★★★

April 19, 2013

Sarah Thebarge’s The Invisible Girls: A Memoir is a testament to endurance, hope, and selflessness. Sarah grew up a pastor’s child in a conservative Christian family. As a young adult, her future seemed bright. A bright student, she earned a pair of Ivy League degrees in journalism and medicine....


amelia rated it ★☆☆☆☆

December 30, 2014

Absolutely seeped in self-congratulation and condescension, with no small amount of Christian evangelizing. There's probably a good story in here and a worthwhile cause, but... well, the last line of the book is literally a child telling the author "... when I grow up, I want to be just like you....


Hannah rated it ★★★☆☆

March 19, 2017

a lot of mixed feelings about this....... probably more like 3.5 it was a good story with a potential for a really good message but it was pretty fragmented and at times I wished there would have been more of the Somali girls





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