Dream Hoarders: How the American Upper Middle Class Is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust, Why That Is a Problem, and What to Do about It by Richard V. Reeves

Into the Wild

Read Dream Hoarders: How the American Upper Middle Class Is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust, Why That Is a Problem, and What to Do about It Online Free - America is becoming a class-based society.

It is now conventional wisdom to focus on the wealth of the top 1 percent—especially the top 0.01 percent—and how the ultra-rich are concentrating income and prosperity while incomes for most other Americans are stagnant. But the most important, consequential, and widening gap in American society is between the upper middle class and everyone else.

Reeves defines the upper middle class as those whose incomes are in the top 20 percent of American society. Income is not the only way to measure a society, but in a market economy it is crucial because access to money generally determines who gets the best quality education, housing, health care, and other necessary goods and services.

As Reeves shows, the growing separation between the upper middle class and everyone else can be seen in family structure, neighborhoods, attitudes, and lifestyle. Those at the top of the income ladder are becoming more effective at passing on their status to their children, reducing overall social mobility. The result is not just an economic divide but a fracturing of American society along class lines. Upper-middle-class children become upper-middle-class adults.

These trends matter because the separation and perpetuation of the upper middle class corrode prospects for more progressive approaches to policy. Various forms of “opportunity hoarding” among the upper middle class make it harder for others to rise up to the top rung. Examples include zoning laws and schooling, occupational licensing, college application procedures, and the allocation of internships. Upper-middle-class opportunity hoarding, Reeves argues, results in a less competitive economy as well as a less open society.

Inequality is inevitable and can even be good, within limits. But Reeves argues that society can take effective action to reduce opportunity hoarding and thus promote broader opportunity. This fascinating book shows how American society has become the very class-defined society that earlier Americans rebelled against—and what can be done to restore a more equitable society.



Title : Dream Hoarders: How the American Upper Middle Class Is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust, Why That Is a Problem, and What to Do about It
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 081572912X
Edition Language : English
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 240 pages


Reviews


Trish rated it ★★★★☆

June 20, 2017

At first Reeves’ argument, that the upper middle class should voluntarily give up their advantaged place in society, sounds virtuous, if a little unlikely. But gradually, listening to his arguments in this slim book of charts, graphs, and statistics, we remember what we don’t like about America:...


Stephen rated it ★★★★☆

July 01, 2017

I hated this book. I knew I would hate it when I read Dr. Reeves' 10 Jun Sun NY Times article "Stop Pretending You're Not Rich". https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/10/op... I knew I would hate that Dr. Reeves would call me out for my efforts at gaming the system (529s, property, investments, parentin...


Paul rated it ★★★★☆

June 06, 2017

Eye-opening. Scary. Brave. Reeves lays out an unpopular and unvarnished truth about America's privileged class of which he and most of his readers (including me) are members. His sincere and thorough scholarship make for an interesting if uncomfortable read.


Miranda rated it ★★★☆☆

July 17, 2017

Placeholder review Some good observations and awful conclusions. I will write more later. But in the meantime I will note that this guy quotes the likes of Charles Murray (of The Bell Curve fame!) and implies that virtually anything people do to help their children is part of a malicious economic...


Helen rated it ★★★☆☆

July 03, 2017

Reeves has a good point when he talks about how the top 20% (upper middle class) of the American population are getting more benefits than they deserve, and how this should change. However many of the data he presents are not new, and the policy proposals he offers are so large and varied that it...


Bryan rated it ★★★★☆

August 18, 2017

review tk


Bruce rated it ★★★★☆

July 05, 2017

Thoughtful, carefully-drawn, mostly moral argument about barriers to opportunity in America, many of which are erected by those who have "made it." Prose is accessible and personable, though repetitiveness is a problem.


Rachel rated it ★★★☆☆

August 11, 2017

This is really a 3.5 star review. It was a pleasant enough read with some new ways of thinking about the elasticity of the upper middle class. It was also good to have solid recommendations at the end. However it never felt very deep, more like an extended magazine article. I would recommend "Our...


Catherine rated it ★★★★☆

July 30, 2017

This is a truly important book. Progressive politics has supported the idea of the 1% vs the 99% and that has unburdened affluent liberal thinkers from taking responsibility as part of the top 20%. There are opportunities and advantages that accrue to those in the top quintile that we are relucta...


Rin rated it ★★★★☆

July 11, 2017

This book talks about the benefits the upper-middle class have, which they pass on to their children through various tax breaks, zoning laws, social connections and educational investments and training. To be quite honest, I read the book simply for this reason. To see how the rich raise their ch...





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